Can Expensive Employee Wellness Programs Work in a High-Pressure Culture of Long Working Hours?

The July edition of the Wellness Barometer caused quite a stir by mentioning a recent peer-reviewed study stating that corporate wellness programs may not be as effective as previously thought. In response, several members of the GWI community pointed out that the study’s methodology was “inherently flawed” (published in the GWI Brief of August 29). This prompted us to engage in some basic research on…

Climate Change and Mental Wellness: More Conflict, Suicide and Rage

MONTHLY BAROMETER Last month, we mentioned that global warming is raising the cost of capital in those countries most affected by climate change. It’s also hitting their prospects for economic growth through ripple effects, such as lower productivity during periods of extreme heat. Any assessment of climate change for investment purposes can only be undertaken in the most granular possible manner, but from a top-down…

Study: Best Sports for a Long Life? Social like Tennis, not Solitary like Jogging

A new study from Danish researchers suggests that people that played social or team sports, such as tennis or soccer, tend to live longer than those that who do solitary fitness, such as jogging, swimming or cycling. The study found that all exercise increased longevity, but, while cycling added 3.7 years and running 3.2 to a person’s life, tennis added 9.7, badminton added 6.2, and…

Must-Reads from the Wellness World

How tourists are destroying the places they love – Der Spiegel, August 21, 2018 Over the past weeks, we’ve read dozens of articles on the rising backlash against tourism. This one is a bit long but particularly well researched. Mass tourism has created over-tourism, and, in many beautiful spots, the infrastructure and the local population are buckling under the pressure and the predatory nature of…

Expert Response: Recent Negative Study on Workplace Wellness is Inherently Flawed

  In the last Brief, we reported on a new study from the University of Illinois finding that their wellness program had “no causal effect on the activities, health, productivity and medical spending” for its 5,000 participants. This negative study led to an expected storm of headlines in the media, summed up by the one from Bloomberg: “Workplace Wellness Programs Really Don’t Work” – letting…