Wellness Evidence Study: Walk Fast! Two New Studies Reveal Its Power

Two recent studies show the impact that walking speed can have on people’s health. A French study in the British Medical Journal (tracking 3,000+ older people for five years) found that people with the slowest walking speed had a significantly increased risk of death compared to those who walked the fastest—including a threefold increased rate of cardiovascular death. A new clinical trial from the University…

The Global Baby-Bust Means Aging Populations Will Skyrocket

  The sharp global deceleration of population growth is an under-appreciated yet critical phenomenon for long-term investors and business leaders—and certainly crucial to the future wellness industry. While this is primarily driven by social choice, endocrine disruption (that has caused a 50% decline in sperm count over the past 50 years, plus soaring miscarriages) is also an important contributing factor. Now COVID has added another…

Industry Research: Charting Your Own Mental Wellness Pathways

There are numerous pathways to mental wellness, many of which are known to us but often seem like an impossible to-do list. In GWI’s report Defining the Mental Wellness Economy, we segment them into four broad categories: 1) activity and creativity, 2) growth and nourishment, 3) rest and rejuvenation, and 4) connection and meaning. These domains have mind-body and internal-external dimensions, although their boundaries may…

Wellness Evidence Study: Childhood Diet Has Lifelong Impact

A new study (on mice) by UC Riverside found that eating too much sugar and fat in childhood can alter microbiomes for life, even if you eat healthier later in life. An early-life Western diet led to a significant decrease in the total number and diversity of gut bacteria, and while regular exercise positively impacted gut bacteria, a bad early-life diet had more long-lasting effects…

Industry Research: Defining “Mental Wellness” vs. “Mental Health”

Defining Mental Wellness Mental wellness is a term that is increasingly used in the popular lexicon, but it is vague and not well-understood. People associate mental wellness with many different types of activities: meditating, listening to music, talking to a friend, taking a walk in nature, taking a vacation, getting a massage, taking a bubble bath, squeezing a stress ball, or just carving out some…

Wellness Evidence Study: Exercise Linked to Creativity and Imagination

A new study from the University of Graz (Austria) found a direct link between everyday physical activity (simple walking or moderate exercise) and greater creativity and inventiveness. The researchers found that active people came up with significantly more­—and more innovative—ideas during tests (whether conceiving of new usages for an umbrella or finishing partial drawings) than sedentary people. ACCESS STUDY