Definition of Stress Management

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Stress management is a wide spectrum of techniques and psychotherapies aimed at controlling a person’s level of stress, especially chronic stress, usually for the purpose of and for the motive of improving everyday functioning. Stress produces numerous physical and mental symptoms which vary according to each individual’s situational factors. These can include a…Read more

Explore Stress Management research in the following databases: 

PubMed  Trip  Cochrane*
*The Cochrane database requires users to enter the search term manually. Enter “stress management”


Research Spotlight

The databases often return hundreds of medical studies for a single wellness approach. This section summarizes a sampling of five studies – providing just a taste of the available research. 

  • Low to Moderate Levels of Stress Boost Brain Functioning
    A new study in Psychiatry Research indicates that low to moderate levels of stress are good for your brain. “Good” stress levels proved psychologically beneficial, acting as a kind of inoculation against mental health disorders, such as depression and antisocial behavior. They also build resilience to cope with future stressful experiences, and positively impact neurocognitive abilities, from working memory to cognitive flexibility. 
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  • Stress Ages the Immune System
    A 2022 study from the University of Southern California indicates that stress–whether from traumatic events, work, or discrimination–rapidly speeds up aging in the immune system, which is associated with increased risk of cancer, cardiovascular disease and infection. The researchers measured social stress levels against immune cell counts. People with the highest stress scores had significantly lower percentages of fresh disease fighters and higher percentages of worn-out white blood cells. This unique study may explain disparities in age-related health and the unequal toll of COVID-19.
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  • Stress/Psychological Distress Radically Increases Risk of Death 
    A large, pooled meta-analysis of ten population-based studies by NHS Scotland (2012) aimed to quantify the link between stress levels and cause-specific mortality. Tracking 68,000+ initially cancer-free subjects over 8+ years, the findings were grim: moderate stress increased the risk of death by 40%. Highly symptomatic stress increased it by more than 90%, with deaths largely due to heart disease, cancer and accidents. Cancer death was only associated with higher level stress.
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  • Group Mindfulness Therapy on Par with Individual Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy in Reducing Stress and Depression
    Because one-on-one cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is in short supply and expensive, researchers at Lund University, Sweden undertook a randomized controlled trial (2015, 215 patients) that compared the impact of eight weeks of regular CBT to mindfulness-based group therapy for patients with anxiety, stress and depression disorders. In both groups, anxiety and depression scores decreased significantly with no significant, statistical differences between the two groups.
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  • Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Leads to Brain Changes and Symptom Improvement for GAD subjects
    The first trial to investigate the neural mechanisms that result from a program of mindfulness based-stress reduction (MBSR), undertaken by researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital (2013), found that an eight-week course of MBSR not only decreased symptoms for people with Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD). Through brain imaging, the researchers identified significant changes in the fronto-limbic areas of the brain (the amygdala), crucial for the regulation of emotion and “stress response.” Researchers argued these neural changes corresponded with the reported symptom improvements.
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  • Group Program Benefited Those with Extensive Symptoms of Work-Related Stress
    An Aarhus University Hospital (Denmark) randomized trial revealed that a three-month group-based stress management program significantly affected perceived stress and positive reframing in people with extensive symptoms of work-related stress.
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Read more study snapshots


Studies-in-Progress/Clinical Trials Underway

A clinical trial is any research study that assigns people to health-related interventions to evaluate the outcomes. “Interventions” include drugs, surgical procedures, devices, behavioral treatments, preventive care, etc.


Access all studies currently available for Stress Management in these databases:

PubMed  Trip  Cochrane*
*The Cochrane database requires users to enter the search term manually. Enter “stress management”